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Consider Direction of Loading When Sizing Fillet Welds

Escrito por Leandro Peres Ferreira. Posted in Processos de Soldagem

Practical Ideas for the Design Professional by Duane K. Miller, Sc.D., P.E.

The traditional approach used to design a fillet weld assumes that the load is resisted by the weld’s throat, regardless of the direction of loading. Experience and experimentation, however, have shown that fillet welds loaded perpendicular to their longitudinal axis have an ultimate strength that is approximately 50% greater than the same weld loaded parallel to the longitudinal axis. The traditional approach, in which direction of loading is not considered, is therefore conservative. Such a philosophy was incorporated into the AWS D1.1 Structural Welding Code - Steel, as represented by the following provision from the 1994 edition.

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Fillet Welds That Are “Too Long”

Escrito por Leandro Peres Ferreira. Posted in Processos de Soldagem

Practical Ideas for the Design Professional by Duane K. Miller, Sc.D., P.E.

When fillet welds exceed a certain leg size to length ratio, and when such welds are “end loaded,” they can become “too long.” That is, the added length may not add strength that is proportional to the increase in length. This situation rarely occurs, as will be seen, but the designer should be aware of when it occurs, why the capacity is diminished, and how to mitigate the effects.

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Consider Penetration When Determining Fillet Weld Size

Escrito por Leandro Peres Ferreira. Posted in Processos de Soldagem

Practical Ideas for the Design Professional by Duane K. Miller, Sc.D., P.E.

Introduction A flat-faced, equal-legged fillet weld in a 90° T-joint has a theoretical throat dimension of 0.707 ω, where ω is the leg size (Figure 1). This assumes fusion is achieved to the root of the joint, but not necessarily beyond that point.

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Thicker Steel Permits the Use of Opposing Arcs

Escrito por Leandro Peres Ferreira. Posted in Processos de Soldagem

Practical Ideas for the Design Professional by Duane K. Miller, P.E.

An Efficient Technology

A welding system featuring opposing arcs is commonly used to weld stiffeners to webs on bridge members. In concept, opposing arc systems can be used to fabricate any tee joint configuration requiring fillet welds on both sides of the vertical member.